Where do you get your stories?

Where do you get your stories?

I think one of the reasons I’m attracted to learning is my love of stories.  To remedy my slow start at reading in elementary school, my mother dedicated countless hours forcing me to read stories.  It worked, as I started writing my first book at the age of ten (still unfinished to this day) and I thank her for instilling in me the love a good story.

Stories are everywhere;  in the news, movies, television, marketing and advertising. Everywhere that is,  except in the majority of training. At the end of the day, most training is about trying to change behavior. It is something that we connect to on a personal level. Most of us will want to know why we should change? After all, it’s hard, it takes time, it rarely works.

Stories help fill the gaps. They answer, “what’s in it for me”, because they relate personal shared experiences with what may otherwise be dry, bland information. I often thought that if my 10th grade physics teacher had just given me some sort of scenario no matter how fictional, ” The year is 2022 and you are the sole survivor of a spaceship crash on Mars. You’ve got to figure out how to path a trajectory back to earth”, then I could have understood why I needed to learn physics.

Where do you get stories? How do you incorporate them into your learning? How effective do you think they are? I found Terrence Gargiuolo’s Virtual Trainer Checklist for Interactive Delivery a good place to start generating ideas.